SOL #VS 4, Life in the VA Colony, History

Blueprint Categories

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The student will demonstrate knowledge of life in the Virginia colony by
a)   explaining the importance of agriculture and its influence on the institution of slavery;
b)   describing how the culture of colonial Virginia reflected the origins of European (English, Scots-Irish, German) immigrants, Africans, and American Indians;
c)   explaining the reasons for the relocation of Virginia's capital from Jamestown to Williamsburg to Richmond;
d) describing how money, barter, and credit were used; and
e) describing everyday life in colonial Virginia.

History

40%

Geography

25%

Civics

18%

Economics

18%

Prior Knowledge

Previous/Related SOL

Vocabulary

Words and Definitions

Assessment(s)

Related SOL’s
V.S. 4 analyze map
•   Angola, Africa

Immigrants: Germans and Scots-Irish

Geography of the Coastal Plain region 

Adapt – changing to fit the environment
African Americans – people of African descent
agricultural societies – areas with an agricultural economy
agriculture - farming
American Indians – Native peoples
Appalachian Plateau – Westernmost region of Virginia
architecture – building design
banks – financial institutions
barns – farm building
barter - trade
beliefs – religious feelings
capital – city containing the government seat
capital resources – things (desks, chairs, factories, etc)
cash crop – crop grown to make a profit
consumers – people who use a good or service

contaminated – containing unwanted materials (brackish)
credit – buy now, pay later
cultural landscapes – barns, churches and homes reflecting a heritage
culture – customs and beliefs of a group of people
currency – coins, paper money, and checks
customs – habits reflecting a culture or group (turkey for Thanksgiving)
debt – a good or service  owed to another
dependent – relying upon others
diseases – illness caused by germs or virus
diversity - difference
economy- monetary system of a group of people
elevation – height of the land
England
English
enslaved – owned and forced to work by another
environment - surroundings
European origins – coming from England, France, Spain, etc.
exchanging - trading
First Americans - Indians
forms of exchange – forms of money or trade goods
geographical factors – things about the land that affect decisions
Germans
goods and services -  economical elements
harvested – picked a crop
homes – structures in which people live
human resources - people
increased - grew
inexpensive – does not cost much
influence – to change or alter
inland – not near the ocean
Jamestown first permanent English settlement in America
John Rolfe – produced a suitable tobacco at Jamestown
labor - work
limited – having a set amount
medium of exchange – cash, coins, tobacco receipts
migration route – where people travel from one place to another (Shenandoah Valley)
money – cash, coins, checks
natural resources – useful things from nature
places of worship - churches
plantations – large farms
population – number of people in an area
produce – to make
profitable – money-making
Richmond – third capital of Virginia – reflects English culture
Roanoke – reflects Native American culture
savings – money set aside and not spent
Scotch-Irish – people from Scotland and Ireland
seepage – leaking of salt water into fresh water
Shenandoah Valley – migration route
situated - located
source of labor - workers
success – good outcome
Tidewater region – Easternmost region of Virginia
tobacco – cash crop of Virginia
trade – to swap
traditional homelands – where Native Americans habitually lived
transformed - changed
unhealthy – not good for the body
unique – unlike any other
Williamsburg – second capital of Virginia

 


Resources

Books

Technology

Lessons

Trade Books

Text Books

Harcourt Horizons Virginia
Virginia Studies Weekly


Interactive Maps

Cause and Effect Foldable

Settlement Areas Foldable

Moving the Capital Foldable

Colonial Economics Foldable

 

 

Study Guides/Daily Activities

VA DOE Resources

 

Colonial Life Organizer

Colonial Virginia Test

 

 

 

Colonial Society

Enhanced Scope and Sequence
Attachment L and M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 


Essential Understandings Essential Questions Essential Knowledge Essential Skills

VS.4a

The success of tobacco as a cash crop transformed life in the Virginia colony and encouraged slavery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VS.4b

The culture of colonial Virginia reflected the beliefs, customs, and architecture of the Europeans, Africans, and American Indians living there.

 

Although it was a colony of England, Virginia developed a unique culture different from that of England


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VS.4c

A variety of factors explain the reasons for moving Virginia’s capital. 

England became Great Britain in the early 1700s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VS.4d

Money was not often used in the early Virginia colony.

VS.4a

What effect did agriculture have on the Virginia colony?

How did agriculture in the Virginia colony influence the institution of slavery?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VS.4b

How did the culture of colonial Virginia reflect beliefs, customs, and architecture of Europeans, Africans, and American Indians? 

Where did the various cultural groups settle?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VS.4c

What were some reasons why Virginia’s capital was moved from Jamestown to Williamsburg? 

What were some reasons why Virginia’s capital was moved from Williamsburg to Richmond?

 

 

 

 

VS.4d

What forms of exchange were used in the Virginia colony? 

VS.4a

Terms to know
•   cash crop: A crop that is grown to sell for money rather than for use by the growers

The economy of the Virginia colony depended on agriculture as the primary source of wealth.

Tobacco became the most profitable agricultural product.
•   Tobacco was sold in England as a cash crop.

The successful cultivation of tobacco depended on a steady and inexpensive source of labor.
•   African men, women, and children were brought to the Virginia colony and enslaved to work on the plantations.

The Virginia colony became dependent on slave labor, and this dependence lasted a long time.

VS.4b

Culture of colonial Virginia

Whenever people settle an area, they change the culture and landscape to reflect their beliefs, customs, and architecture. Examples of architecture that reflect different cultures include

barns

homes

places of worship (e.g., churches).

 

Place names reflecting culture

English – Richmond

American Indian – Roanoke

Settlement areas

English and other Europeans settled primarily in the Coastal Plain (Tidewater) and the Piedmont regions.

Germans and Scots-Irish settled primarily in the Shenandoah Valley, which was along the migration route.

Africans were settled primarily in the Coastal Plain (Tidewater) and the Piedmont regions, where tobacco agriculture required a great deal of labor.

Prior to the arrival of the settlers, American Indians lived throughout Virginia. After the settlers arrived, most were forced inland. 

Migration and living in new areas caused people to adapt old customs to their new environments.

VS.4c

Reasons why the capital was moved from Jamestown to Williamsburg

Drinking water was contaminated by seepage of salt water.

Unhealthy living conditions caused diseases.

Fire destroyed wooden and brick buildings at Jamestown.

Reasons why the capital was moved from Williamsburg to Richmond

The population was moving westward.

Richmond was a more central location.

Moving to Richmond increased the distance from the sea and possible attack by the British.

 

VS.4d

 

Terms to know

·   money: A medium of exchange (currency, which includes coins and paper bills)

·   barter: Trading or exchanging of goods and services without the use of money

·   credit: Buying a good or service now and paying for it later

·   debt: A good or service owed to someone

·   savings: Money put away to save or to spend at a later time

 

Few people had paper money or coins to use to buy goods and services.

 

Barter was commonly used instead of money.

 

Tobacco was used as money. A tobacco farmer could use his tobacco to pay for goods and services.

 

Farmers and other consumers could also buy goods and services on credit and pay their debts when their crops were harvested and sold.

 

Colonial Virginia had no banks.

 

VS.4a

Determine cause-and-effect relationships. (VS.1b)

Draw conclusions and make generalizations. (VS.1d)

Make connections between past and present. (VS.1e)

Sequence events in Virginia history. (VS.1f)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 VS.4b

Determine cause-and-effect relationships. (VS.1b)

Compare and contrast historical events. (VS.1c)

Draw conclusions and make generalizations. (VS.1d)

Interpret ideas and events from different historical perspectives. (VS.1g) 

Analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, and historical events. (VS.1i)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VS.4c

Determine cause-and-effect relationships. (VS.1b)

Compare and contrast historical events. (VS.1c)

Make connections between past and present. (VS .1e)

Sequence events in Virginia history. (VS.1f)Analyze and interpret maps to explain relationships among landforms, water features, climatic characteristics, and historical events. (VS.1i)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
VS.4d

Determine cause-and-effect relationships. (VS.1b)

 

Draw conclusions and make generalizations. (VS.1d)

 

Make connections between past and present. (VS.1e)